EAL and SPED Graphic Organizer

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There are so many graphic organizers out there.  Some look like ice cream cones, others giant spider webs.  I have found that for me and many of my students, a simple 3-step graphic organizer works the best.

Here is the organizer that I created to work with students who are new or developing their english and students who have limited writing ability.

 

Beginning, Middle, Ending oganizer for drawing and adding key vocabulary

Beginning, Middle, Ending oganizer for drawing and adding key vocabulary

 

Writing Planning 3 step draw

The students can draw main ideas for the beginning, middle, and ending of a story.  After the drawing, they can independently or with teacher guidance, list key vocabulary words from each drawing.  This will help them recall the vocabulary during drafting without too much writing to complete during planning.

As an addition to this, students can also build a vocabulary binder where they begin to store key vocabulary based on alphabetized topics.  More on this for a later post.

I have also found this useful for students who tend to write their “planning” in whole paragraphs and it ends up looking identical to their first draft and takes a very long time to complete.

Web Browsing Fonts for People with Dyslexia

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Research is starting to point toward ways of making text easier to read for people with Dyslexia.  This can be a change in font, size, color and even letter spacing.  Recently a font that has been getting some buzz is Open-Dyslexic.  More information can be found here.

I am always impressed by people creating tools to make the world a better place for others and then sharing it free of charge.  This is just the case with Open-Dyslexic.  This font can be downloaded for use in word processing or creating materials.

If you are a Mac user or Safari Browser user however, there is a very quick add-on that can change the fonts you see on websites as well to utilize this font.

When in Safari, click on Safari in the tool bar at the top.  From there click on Safari Extensions…

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A webpage will open with a list of extensions.  Use the left side category options and select Productivity.

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Next scroll down until you see the extension Open-Dyslexic.   Click on Install Now.

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It is as simple as that.  You should now see all text in Safari using Open-Dyslexic.  There is also helpful shading to differentiate the lines.  Hope this helps.

Sound Levels in the Classroom

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Every administrator, teacher, parent, and student has different levels of tolerance when it comes to sound levels.  Some classrooms I work in can be eerily silent, or too loud for me to think, let alone the students.  The fact is, noise can have an affect on student productivity and learning.  To get more of the science behind this, there is a great article discussing a research study done inside classroom at blog.sparkypro.com.

There are some ways that we can help control this level for the entire class and for individual students.

For the entire class, it can be useful to explicitly teach the students what the expected sound level should be for different activities.

The full version with description is available here:

Classroom Noise Meter

This visual is used to set expectations before and activity and silently prompt a reminder to the students.  In my room I have this printed and on the white board with an arrow to the present noise level.

For individual students, this could be made smaller and placed on their desk.

This is just one of many ways to set expectations or make accommodations for noise levels within the classroom.

Preparing your child with Autism for travel

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I was reading an article by Miss Rorey about traveling with your child with Autism.  This post is specific to airplanes, but I think the ideas can be used whenever you are traveling for a distance or even preparing to be waiting for an appointment.  The key take home from this post is to be prepared.  Practice skills  in a safe environment, and slowly generalize these learned skills to new environments.

This is the same process we use when working with behaviors in the classroom.  Many times, we have to practice appropriate behaviors in a safer, easier environment first.  This way we can build up the student’s confidence by having them experience success, then slowly fading to more difficult environments.

Whether you are planing on a road trip, airline flight, or just a long wait in a crowded waiting room, take a look at this blog post first.  If you find success, use these same principles in other areas of your child’s life.

Miss Rorey 

Connecting Parents Before the IEP

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Pre-IEP Parent Questionnaire

As special educators, part of our job is to collaborate with a team on each student’s program.  This team can include many people from teachers, administration, specialists, and parents.

We have to make sure that the parent is involved from the very beginning.  This starts before the IEP is written and assessments completed.  An easy way to help parents get involved is by asking them to fill out a questionnaire.  This can give great insight to what their expectations are for you and what they expect for their child.  This is just the first step to better involvement and showing parents that they will be taking an active role in their child’s education.

Here is a short example of a possible parent IEP questionnaire.  Take from this or add to it what you would like.  Give me any feedback you have about your thoughts or experience with using a questionnaire prior to the planing stages of the educational program.